Posts tagged ‘big data’

July 22, 2014

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health?

After decades as a technological laggard, medicine has entered its data age. Mobile technologies, sensors, genome sequencing, and advances in analytic software now make it possible to capture vast amounts of information about our individual makeup and the environment around us. The sum of this information could transform medicine, turning a field aimed at treating the average patient into one that’s customized to each person while shifting more control and responsibility from doctors to patients.

 

The question is: can big data make health care better?

 

“There is a lot of data being gathered. That’s not enough,” says Ed Martin, interim director of the Information Services Unit at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “It’s really about coming up with applications that make data actionable.”

 

The business opportunity in making sense of that data—potentially $300 billion to $450 billion a year, according to consultants McKinsey & Company—is driving well-established companies like Apple, Qualcomm, and IBM to invest in technologies from data-capturing smartphone apps to billion-dollar analytical systems. It’s feeding the rising enthusiasm for startups as well.

 

Venture capital firms like Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, as well as the corporate venture funds of Google, Samsung, Merck, and others, have invested more than $3 billion in health-care information technology since the beginning of 2013—a rapid acceleration from previous years, according to data from Mercom Capital Group.   more at http://www.technologyreview.com/news/529011/can-technology-fix-medicine/ ;

Source: www.technologyreview.com

January 8, 2014

Vos données de santé m’appartiennent !

“10 janvier 2018. Il y a quelques minutes, j’ai manifesté mon mécontentement sur Facebook envers l’Assurance maladie, qui venait de m’avertir, via son appli pour smartphoneObservanceRemboursement, que je ne serai pas remboursé de ma dernière prescription d’antibiotiques. La raisons invoquée : le tracker NFS intégré dans la pilule indiquait que je n’avais pas respecté l’heure de prise. Sans plus attendre, ma mutuelle m’a aussitôt signifié qu’elle décidait d’augmenter le montant de mes cotisations en tant que mutualiste non responsable”.

Ce scénario, qui semble incroyable aujourd’hui, est pourtant en train de se construire doucement mais sûrement. Le cœur du système de santé actuel ne réside pas dans les objets de santé connectés ou les mApps tel que pourrait nous le faire croire l’environnement médiatique, mais bel et bien dans les données, à travers un double phénomène : l’Open Data et le Data mining, également appelé webcrawling.

Open Data en santé, le débat qui se fera sans vous…

Focalisant l’attention de nombreux acteurs depuis plusieurs mois, le débat sur l’Open Data en santé se concentre principalement sur l’accès au Sniiram (Système National d’Information Inter-Régimes de l’Assurance Maladie). Si ce débat est on ne peut plus légitime, il est toutefois nécessaire de s’interroger sur les conditions de sa mise en place, dont les usagers de santé, cotisants, patients et biens-portants semblent déjà avoir été exclus.

En effet, parmi les 43 personnalités composant la commission Open Data en santé (1), une seule, Danièle Desclerc Dulac, Secrétaire générale du CISS, représente les patients et usagers de santé, voire deux si l’on intègre à cette définition les consommateurs, à travers la présence de Mathieu Escot, chargé de mission à l’UFC Que Choisir.

See on club-digital-sante.fr

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
January 6, 2014

Big Data : opportunité lucrative pour les startups | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

3,6 milliards de dollars pour l’année 2013 seule. C’est le montant des investissements enregistrés dans les startups du Big Data cette année. Si le chiffre est pour le moins conséquent, il faut, pour en observer la réelle étendue, le mettre en relation avec le volume des investissement précédents. Ce sont ainsi entre 2008 et 2012 un peu moins de 5 milliards de dollars qui ont été investis. Il apparaît ainsi qu’entre crainte de bulle fiscale et contexte économique inespéré, le Big Data offre des opportunités extrêmement intéressantes pour les jeunes entrepreneurs. C’est du moins ce qui semble se dégager à la lecture de l’infographie publiée par Big Data Startup mettant en lumière les structures de financement et d’investissement des grandes startups de 2013.

Un investissement important et disséminé

Ces 3,6 milliards de dollars ne se sont cependant pas concentrés uniquement sur quelques grandes startups mais semblent bien avoir été répartis de manière relativement égale entre les startups. Ainsi, en moyenne, les levées de fonds de startups du Big Data enregistrées en 2013 s’élevaient à près de 210 millions de dollars. La startup ayant ainsi reçu les investissements les plus importants,Palantir, société qui offre des solutions analytiques au Big Data, a atteint 556 millions de dollars. Toutefois, MongoDB, la seconde startup du classement n’a enregistré “que” 231 millions de dollars. Ce dynamisme des startups du Big Data se retrouve dans les différents processus d’acquisitions et de fusions observés entre les différents acteurs. Il s’agit ainsi non seulement d’opérations effectuées entre startups et ce sur une base relativement fréquente, mais l’on observe surtout de très nombreux rachats de startups par de grandes sociétés. On peut ainsi noter le rachat record deClimate Corporation par Monsanto en octobre, Atlas par Facebook en mars ou de Locationary parApple en juillet.

See on www.atelier.net

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
January 3, 2014

Big Data, Big Pharma, Big Privacy Catastrophe

Companies are actively, aggressively targeting you using your own personal data, without your knowledge or permission.

That’s not good for your privacy, but it’s hardly news – except when it’s the healthcare industry.

 

Yesterday, news broke that healthcare companies are identifying all manner of pertinent medical details about you without setting eyes on your medical chart.  How?  Personal habits – all gleaned online and aggregated into detailed, invasive profiles using data mining algorithms.

The news is alarming: Big Pharma companies figuring out what patients might be interested in an obesity drug based on clues that imply a couch-potato existence, others finding participants for a study using clues based on data mining, people getting called at home by medical telemarketers who know more than a few sensitive details about their health.

Is it a violation of HIPAA?  Amazingly, no – all of these very personal details are inferred based on probability (likely accurate but probability nonetheless), not by talking to your doctor illegally.  Yet it’s clearly an overstep into an ethically gray area.  And that’s why the question of consumer protection is one that should weigh heavily on everyone’s minds.

Right now, it’s recruiting patients for a drug study that one could argue might help that person and countless others.

See on www.forbes.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
January 3, 2014

Big Data “should enable ‘precision’ medical treatment” | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation


Interview with Jean-Pierre Thierry, member of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) oversight committee, on the occasion of a presentation on the ‘World Healt IT 2014’ event, which is due to take place in Nice next April.There’s a lot of talk nowadays about Big Data in health. So where in fact are we on this?

When you look at the ICT sector, you can’t help but notice a style of communication which favours ‘buzz’ or even ‘hype’. What we need to do is identify what’s really happening behind catch-all terms such as ‘Big Data’. Under this term there are two different approaches emerging. Firstly there’s data mining for analysis purposes and secondly there’s Big Data with great emphasis on the ‘Big’, which is very relevant to the health sector today. The volume of medical data which makes up a person’s traditional medical file has vastly increased, especially now that it includes medical imaging. And now that gene studies are starting to become widespread, they are also going to generate considerable volumes of data. Moreover, we’ll have to keep the raw data over a long period so that we can re-examine the databases in the light of advances in medical research.

How are advances in genomics now impacting medical treatment?

As regards the healthcare sector, there’s one thing that needs to be clearly understood: it’s not simply that genomics is going to generate huge volumes of data, we basically need to be able to analyse it, and in particular to look for correlations between certain mutations or between the presence of genes and certain illnesses, cancers being a prime example. This new approach should translate into a truly new approach to performing diagnostics. Whereas generally we used to make an analysis per organ, we’ll now be able to use metabolic pathway analysis, concentrating on the mutations that were present before the illness set in, and on the mutations that we find in the cancerous tumours. We’ll be trying to correlate the presence of these genes with the illness so that we can develop targeted therapies and also provide each individual person with specific prevention advice. What we’re talking about here is technology which could allow us to ‘personalise’ illnesses and patients, or alternatively start out from an average profile and then personalise the approach to treating each individual. This process of ‘individualisation’, which should enable ‘precision’ medical treatment, will mean that we are able to identify ten or twenty different illnesses where before we used to diagnose just one.

See on www.atelier.net

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 26, 2013

Expanding into healthcare big data? Here’s a big data design primer

Aaron Kimball co-founded WibiData in 2010. He has worked with Hadoop since 2007 and is a committer on the Apache Hadoop project.

Software applications have traditionally been perceived as a unit of computation designed and used to solve a problem. Whether an application is a CRM tool that helps manage customer information or a complex supply-chain management system, the problem it solves is often rather specific. Applications are also frequently designed with a relatively static set of input and output interfaces, and communication to and from the application uses specially designed (or chosen) protocols.

Applications are also designed around data. The data that an application uses to solve a problem is stored using a data platform. This underlying data platform has historically been designed to enable optimal data storage and retrieval. Somewhere in the process of storage and retrieval of data, an application applies computation is to produce results in the application.

One unfortunate side effect of this optimized data storage and retrieval design is that it requires data to be structured in a predefined way (both on disk and during information design and retrieval.) In the world of big data, applications must draw on data from rigidly structured elements, such as names, addresses, quantities, and birthdays, as well as to loose and [unstructured data, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unstructured_data] such as images and free-form text.

Defining and building a big data application can be perplexing given the lack of rigidity in the underlying data. This lack of structure makes it more difficult to precisely define what a big data application will do. This applies to communication interfaces, computation on unstructured or semi-structured data and even communication with other applications.

While the traditional application may have solved a specific problem, the big data application doesn’t limit itself to a highly specific or targeted problem. Its objective is to provide a framework to solve many problems. A big data application manages life-cycles of data in a pragmatic and predictable way. Big data applications may include a batch or high-latency component, a low-latency (or real-time component), or even an in-stream component. Big data applications do not replace traditional single-problem applications, but complement them.

See on medcitynews.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 23, 2013

Les entreprises ne sont toujours pas assez matures pour la Big Data | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Le Big Data est une opportunité historique pour les entreprises, du moins en théorie, en pratique la mise en place de systèmes analytiques permettant de faire sens des données est encore insuffisante.

L’ère du Big Data n’est peut être pas encore complètement arrivée. Si ces deux mots sont devenus un enjeu majeur, et ce non seulement pour les entreprises mais aussi pour les systèmes de gestion et d’administration au sens large, public comme privé, les applications pratiques du concept sont encore au mieux incomplètes, au pire inexistantes. De fait la Big Data n’est pas seulement un changement d’outil mais requiert une refonte presque entière de la façon dont les entreprises appréhendent leurs services informatiques, demandant notamment de très lourds investissements afin de pouvoir extraire de ce maelström de données, des informations utilisables dans la conduite des opérations réelles. C’est du moins ce qui semble apparaître à la lecture des résultats de l’étude menée par la société américaine EMC. Effectué auprès de quelques 10 000 décideurs informatiques provenant d’une cinquantaine de pays différents, ce sondage semble montrer une certain retard des pays les plus développés devant les obstacles à la réalisation du Big Data. Ainsi si près de 80% des interrogés reconnaissent l’importance du potentiel impact de l’analytique dans la prise de décision, seuls 2/3 d’entre eux ont effectivement préparé des projets pour la mettre en place.

De la théorie à la pratique

Les décideurs informatiques qu’ils soient directeurs ou chefs de services, semblent majoritairement convaincus, à près de 76%, à la lecture des résultats du sondage, que l’investissement technologique est le facteur stratégique premier pour la viabilité et le succès à long terme de l’entreprise. Si l’on observe les réponses obtenues en Inde, ce chiffre atteint même 92%. De fait, l’importance du Big Data semble être ressentie nettement plus fortement par les pays émergents. En Corée du Sud, ce sont ainsi 81% des personnes interrogées qui admettent penser que le Big Data sera un facteur clé dans la réussite ou non de leur entreprise, contre seulement 29% en Suède par exemple. En pratique, ce sont même respectivement 79% des Taiwanais contre 16% des Japonais qui avancent avoir déjà acquis un avantage compétitif grâce au Big Data. Or si les attentes sont fortes, les entreprises américaines et européennes semblent prendre un certain retard qui pourrait s’avérer très handicapant dans la compétition avec les entreprises asiatiques. 43% des décideurs italiens reconnaissent ainsi n’avoir aucun plan pour le moment quant à l’implémentation de secteurs analytiques. On observe ainsi que les entreprises asiatiques semblent nettement mieux préparées, 90% des entreprises coréennes avançant être techniquement prêt, contre 39% par exemple pour la Pologne. Enfin, dans la gestion des risques et la protection des données, c’est la Chine qui semble le mieux prendre la mesure de l’impact du Big Data : 74% des décideurs interrogés avançant le Big Data comme vital dans leur procédés de protection, contre seulement 56% sur la moyenne mondiale.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 10, 2013

Big Data et Santé : les attentes ne correspondent pas encore à la réalité | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Les professionnels de médecine attendent beaucoup de la mise en place des structures Big Data dans leur secteur, mais les barrières à l’installation sont encore très présentes.

L’arrivée de l’approche Big Data dans les secteurs de la Santé, que ce soit auprès des industries pharmaceutiques, du personnel médical ou des institutions de soin a soulevé de nombreuses et fertiles attentes. En théorie, l’approche analytique induite permettrait un changement structurel dans l’approche des maladies. Un diagnostic par voie métabolique qui permettra une dynamique nettement plus individualisée. Si les acteurs sont unanimes dans leurs attentes et dans les avantages espérés, le Big Data n’est cependant pas encore une réalité dans la Santé. Les chercheurs de la Society of Actuaries américaine ont ainsi publié un sondage effectué auprès des professionnels de la santé, montrant que si d’important bénéfices sont attendus, l’état présent du Big Data est encore sinon contre productif, du moins lacunaire.

Great expectations

Ce sont ainsi 45% seulement des professionnels interrogés qui déclarent que le Big Data a un effet bénéfique et notable dans leurs pratiques. Considérant le peu de temps disponible pour mettre en place de telles infrastructures, ce chiffre peut déjà sembler relativement élevé. Il faut cependant le mettre en opposition aux quelques 22% qui déclarent, du moins pour le moment, ne recevoir aucun bénéfice de leur structure Big Data. Ces résultats semblent ainsi indiquer, plutôt qu’un refus volontaire de mettre en place le Big Data, une certaine déception par rapport aux attentes. Car, en effet, 87% des preneurs de décision au sein des acteurs de la Santé reconnaissent aisément le Big Data comme ayant un potentiel impact important sur la conduite de leur business model. Comment expliquer dès lors une telle différenciation entre attente et réalité? Au vu de ce sondage, c’est le manque d’expérience qui émerge comme facteur clé dans l’efficience du Big Data. Ainsi,si les structures apparaissent suffisamment matures pour supporter les différents processus, l’obstacle principal reste celui du personnel. Quelques 84% des sondés admettent ainsi manquer cruellement des talents nécessaires pour optimiser leur approche.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 5, 2013

“Le Big Data devrait rendre possible une médecine de précision” | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Les avancées dans la cartographie du génome individuel ouvre la voie à une approche de la médecine plus individualisée et ciblée à travers le diagnostic par voie métabolique.

On parle beaucoup du Big Data dans la Santé, qu’en est-il vraiment? Quand on observe le secteur des TIC, on ne peut s’empêcher de remarquer un mode de communication favorisant le Buzz ou le « hype ». Derrière de tels mots-valises, il s’agit de savoir identifier plus particulièrement les enjeux. Ainsi, pour le Big Data se sont deux approches qui se font jour, d’un côté le data mining en relation avec l’analytique, et de l’autre un Big Data qui met plus l’accent sur le Big et qui est très spécifique du domaine de la santé aujourd’hui. Le volume des données médicales constituant le dossier médical « classique » a largement augmenté, notamment avec l’intégration de l’imagerie médicale mais le début de généralisation des études portant sur le génomes va produire un volume considérable. De surcroît, il faudra conserver les données brutes pour pouvoir réétudier les bases de données en fonction de l’avancement de la recherche médicale, et ce, sur une longue période. Que signifie l’avancée de la génomique pour l’évolution des traitements? Une des dimensions à comprendre dans la santé est que la génomique ne va pas seulement générer de grands volumes de données, il s’agit avant tout de pouvoir les analyser et notamment de chercher des corrélations entre certaines mutations ou présences de gènes et des maladies, à commencer par les cancers. Cette nouvelle approche devrait se traduire par une véritable redéfinition des diagnostics. Là où on faisait un diagnostic typiquement par organe, on sera à même de faire un diagnostic par voie métabolique, en se concentrant sur des mutations qui étaient présentes avant le déclenchement de la maladie et sur celles que l’on retrouve dans les tumeurs. On va ainsi essayer de corréler la présence de ces gênes avec la maladie afin de pouvoir développer des thérapies ciblées ou donner des conseils de prévention adaptés à chaque individu. Nous sommes de cette façon face à une technologie qui pourrait permettre d’individualiser les maladies et les patients ou les individus là où l’on raisonnait à partir d’un profil moyen avant de personnaliser les prises en charge. Le processus d’individualisation qui devrait rendre possible une nouvelle médecine dite de précision, devrait être capable d’identifier 10 ou 20 maladies différentes là ou précédemment on en diagnostiquait qu’une.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
November 17, 2013

How to gain value from big data in healthcare

It is easy to get hung up on the definition of big data, which typically involves the “3 Vs” of volume, velocity and variety, or even the more expansive “7 Vs.”

Big data, the buzzword du jour, has captured our attention with some truly impressive examples of what the future may hold. From medicine and potholes, to restaurant menus and the Higgs Boson, big data is everywhere.

And now for a reality check: most businesses have a lot of work to do before they can embark on a big data initiative.

It is easy to get hung up on the definition of big data, which typically involves the “3 Vs” of volume, velocity and variety, or even the more expansive “7 Vs.” For the vast majority of the 23 million small businesses in the U.S., however, big data can be thought of as a proxy for any data challenge exceeding their storage, compute or management capacity for accurate, timely and cost effective decision-making.

While the threshold for what constitutes big data continues to evolve, businesses of all sizes want to unlock additional value from the data that is most relevant to them, be it on a large or small scale.

A recent survey of 1,000 business and technology executives conducted by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) confirms this point. Three in four respondents indicate data is one of their company’s greatest assets. At the same time, an even greater percentage (78 percent) agrees with the statement “if we could harness all of our data, we would be a much stronger business.”

See on medcitynews.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags: