Posts tagged ‘baby’

January 12, 2014

Un body qui surveille la respiration de votre bébé… Une bonne idée ? : Allodocteurs.fr

Un body qui surveille la respiration de votre bébé à votre place, c’est l’une des nouvelles créations américaines présentées lors du Consumer Electronics Show 2014 (CES), salon mondial de la high-tech, qui se tient actuellement à Las Vegas.

See on www.allodocteurs.fr

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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October 24, 2013

The Tests That Babies Need

The screening of newborns for inherited and congenital disorders has steadily improved and remains critical to their health.

Fifty years ago, a revolution began in neonatal care that has preserved the physical and mental health, and often the lives, of thousands of babies: screening of newborns for inherited and congenital disorders.

On Oct. 15, 1963, the first law requiring that all newborns be screened forphenylketonuria, or PKU, took effect in Massachusetts. PKU, an inherited metabolic disorder, afflicts one in 20,000 of the four million babies born each year in the United States. Children with PKU are missing an enzyme that converts the amino acid phenylalanine to tyrosine, and unless they remain on a special protein-restricted diet, the resulting buildup of phenylketone damages the brain and causes mental retardation and physical disabilities.

Today every state tests babies at birth for PKU — and not just that. There are now more than 50 disorders that can be picked up through screening, 31 of which comprise the “core conditions” of the government’sRecommended Uniform Screening Panel. Other conditions are likely to be added to the panel in the future. All but two of them — hearing loss and critical congenital heart disease — can be detected by automated analysis of a few drops of dried blood from a heel stick done within a few days of birth.

See on well.blogs.nytimes.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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October 14, 2013

The Tests That Babies Need

Fifty years ago, a revolution began in neonatal care that has preserved the physical and mental health, and often the lives, of thousands of babies: screening of newborns for inherited and congenital disorders.

On Oct. 15, 1963, the first law requiring that all newborns be screened forphenylketonuria, or PKU, took effect in Massachusetts. PKU, an inherited metabolic disorder, afflicts one in 20,000 of the four million babies born each year in the United States. Children with PKU are missing an enzyme that converts the amino acid phenylalanine to tyrosine, and unless they remain on a special protein-restricted diet, the resulting buildup of phenylketone damages the brain and causes mental retardation and physical disabilities.

Today every state tests babies at birth for PKU — and not just that. There are now more than 50 disorders that can be picked up through screening, 31 of which comprise the “core conditions” of the government’sRecommended Uniform Screening Panel. Other conditions are likely to be added to the panel in the future. All but two of them — hearing loss and critical congenital heart disease — can be detected by automated analysis of a few drops of dried blood from a heel stick done within a few days of birth.

See on well.blogs.nytimes.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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October 14, 2013

This Minimalist Wearable Device Could Protect Your Child

The latest location-aware wearable device aims to help parents keep track of their kids.

The Launchpad is a series that introduces Mashable readers to compelling startups. If you would like to have your startup considered for inclusion, please see the details here. Name: Guardian One-Liner Pitch: With Guardian’s smartwatch, always know where your children are located. Why It’s Taking Off: Wearable gadgets for specific purposes are growing in popularity, and the price point on Guardian makes it very accessible for parents while still addressing a key pain point. In the future, it should be impossible to lose anything. There’s Tile, a bluetooth-enabled tracker you can attach to a wallet or keys, and Tagg, the tracker for your pets. Bluetooth capabilities seem to improve with every smartphone release, making these types of trackers extremely reliable. The latest location-aware device aims to help parents keep track of their kids. Guardian is a wearable gadget made by Beluvv, a startup in Taiwan. The founders are seasoned entrepreneurs and parents who felt this simple technology could go a long way in keeping children safe. While the issue of missing children is a complicated one, Beluvv’s product, called Guardian, could definitely be part of the solution. Waterproof, with a battery that lasts up to a year and priced at $25, it’s hard to justify not purchasing the device if you have small kids.

See on mashable.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

October 6, 2013

App Turns Your iPad Into a Baby Monitor

If you have two iOS devices, then you’ve got a baby monitor.

Baby Monitor 3G connects any combination of iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch to create a baby monitor system with both audio and video capabilities.

Users designate one device as the Baby Station, which stays in the baby’s room and uses the device’s built-in camera and microphone to monitor the baby. The other device — the Parent Station — is used to watch and listen.

While the app offers many benefits — consider the convenience associated with packing for travel — there are a few drawbacks to using this system. One device, for instance, is completely unusable while the baby is asleep. Also, a device has to be left behind as the Parent Station for any childcare provider. And since the app works by connecting through a shared Wi-Fi network, there is no ability to stream a constant video from the baby’s room when outside of the house, so no checking in from dinner.

Still, this is a very useful parenting hack that makes it possible to keep a close eye on your baby. Just be sure to password-protect that Wi-Fi network to keep outsiders from accessing the baby monitor stream.

See on mashable.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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September 19, 2013

App Turns Your iPad Into a Baby Monitor

If you have two iOS devices, then you’ve got a baby monitor.

Baby Monitor 3G connects any combination of iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch to create a baby monitor system with both audio and video capabilities.

Users designate one device as the Baby Station, which stays in the baby’s room and uses the device’s built-in camera and microphone to monitor the baby. The other device — the Parent Station — is used to watch and listen.

SEE ALSO: Upgrade Your Baby’s Tech With These 9 Gadgets

While the app offers many benefits — consider the convenience associated with packing for travel — there are a few drawbacks to using this system. One device, for instance, is completely unusable while the baby is asleep. Also, a device has to be left behind as the Parent Station for any childcare provider. And since the app works by connecting through a shared Wi-Fi network, there is no ability to stream a constant video from the baby’s room when outside of the house, so no checking in from dinner.

Still, this is a very useful parenting hack that makes it possible to keep a close eye on your baby. Just be sure to password-protect that Wi-Fi network to keep outsiders from accessing the baby monitor stream.

See on mashable.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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September 15, 2013

6 baby activity trackers announced this summer | mobihealthnews

Last week, Boston-based Rest Devices, maker of a smart baby monitor attached to a onesie called Mimo launched a campaign on crowdfunding site Dragon Innovation. The baby monitor connects to a smartphone and tracks the baby’s respiration, skin temperature, body position and activity level and offers an audio feed in real-time.

But this isn’t even the first baby tracking device that has come out in the span of two weeks, let alone over the summer. Since June, various baby monitoring devices have entered the market. These products, while all smartphone connected, range from diapers to even a teddy bear.

Here’s a roundup of this summer’s baby tracking products that MobiHealthNews has found.

Mimo

Launched last week, Mimo has thus far raised $29,000 of its $200,000 goal and has 25 days left in the campaign. The early bird price for the wearable is $100.

Mimo is a system that starts with a tracking monitor in the shape of a turtle, which attaches to a white cotton onesie equipped with machine washable sensors. The team advertises the safety of the attachable turtle, which is too big to swallow, yet safe to chew. To upload information, the turtle can attach to its ‘lilypad,’ which has Bluetooth Smart connectivity.

With the data collected, the connected app can process and run long-term analytics about the baby’s sleep trends and development over time. The app also provides alerts to let the user know if there are changes in breathing patterns, body position, temperature levels, or whether the baby wakes up.

The Mimo app will be available for both iPhone and Android

See on mobihealthnews.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 20, 2013

Inexpensive test is saving infant lives

At birth, Moriah Mudd seemed strong and healthy. Her physical exam by a pediatrician at Riddle Hospital in Philadelphia was completely normal.

At birth, Moriah Mudd seemed strong and healthy. Her physical exam by a pediatrician at Riddle Hospital in Philadelphia was completely normal.

But then a nurse put a sensor on her foot and, within minutes, a machine called a pulse oximeter revealed that her blood oxygen level was alarmingly low, a sign that something could be critically wrong with her heart.

Three weeks later, Moriah underwent surgery at Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Del., to correct a severe congenital heart defect diagnosed by follow-up tests.

Had it gone undetected, she would have gone into respiratory distress at home in Sicklerville, N.J., said her mother, who is a family physician.

“She’s doing great now,” Kimberly Jones-Mudd said of her daughter. “She’s growing, eating, and her heart looks good.”

Pulse oximetry screening for congenital heart disease has become standard practice across the country, less than two years after New Jersey became the first state to require it, surveys show. Even in states such as Pennsylvania and Delaware that do not mandate it, the simple, noninvasive, few-dollar test is done in almost all birthing hospitals, surveys show.

See on www.courant.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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