Archive for ‘Uncategorized’

January 16, 2014

Smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices have become part of our everyday lives. How can we harness these technologies and platforms to manage chronic diseases and improve patient health? | PhRMA

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Digital devices enhance drs understanding of their #patients, says @SIAAmerica. Learn how http://t.co/vkNPLfweA5 #HealthPOV
See on www.phrma.org

January 15, 2014

Twitter / Jawbone: Our own @TravisBogard takes …

Our own @TravisBogard takes the #HealthMatters2014 stage for “Leveraging Digital Platforms to Promote Health.” http://t.co/scDGP14Y8e See on twitter.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

January 12, 2014

le panorama des établissements de santé édition 2013

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See on www.drees.sante.gouv.fr

January 12, 2014

Pour les voeux du nouvel an, il faudra bientôt dire : “Bonne année, bonne santé…connectée !”

“ Selon un rapport de l’IDATE de septembre 2013, intitulé “The Internet of Things Market”, il y aura 80 milliards d’objets connectés en 2020. Un marché à fort potentiel Pour la France, un sondage Ifo…”

See on lemondedelaesante.wordpress.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

January 12, 2014

HealthSpark | York

A shared digital conversation space for healthcare in York… (RT @yorkhealth: #yorkhealth is for York… health and care. The beginning of a social digital journey…

See on yorkhealth.wordpress.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

January 6, 2014

Consumer electronics industry is heading toward world of wearables and sensors

See on Scoop.itPharmaceutical Industry digital vision

The consumer electronics industry is expanding beyond its traditional borders as consumers start to adopt technologies that make use of ubiquitous computing power, sensors, and wearable product designs.

Shawn Dubravac, chief economist of the Consumer Electronics Association, made this observation of the industry at the first press event at the 2014 International CES, the big tech trade show in Las Vegas this week.

Among the trends he sees taking hold are mass customization, thanks to technologies like 3D printing. The 3D printing companies like Maker Bot have their own space at the show now, 7,000 square feet of exhibits, and it’s sold out. He believes about 99,000 3D printers will ship in 2014.

Consumers are also embracing lots of new screens in their lives. As an example, tablets didn’t exist as a big market in 2009. But now, in the U.S., Dubravac said that tablet ownership is expected to exceed 50 percent of households once the numbers from the holiday season are tallied up.

He also said that wearables and the spread of mobile devices are making more new technologies possible. And many of these new devices are autonomous, or able to do smart things on their via robotics or artificial intelligence.

Dubravac said that mobile devices are expected to outnumber computing devices sold to date sometime in 2014 or 2015.

See on venturebeat.com

January 6, 2014

pwc-hri-top-issues-2014-chart-pack.pdf

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See on www.pwc.com

December 26, 2013

20131219-strategies.pdf

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See on www.atelier.net

December 23, 2013

Biotechnology Innovation and Growth in Israel – Pharmaceutical Executive

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Israel is a developed, industrialized nation that, despite ongoing conflict with neighboring Arab countries, remains committed to making technological and medical advances through education and high R&D expenditures. Over recent decades, much of Israel’s economic growth and export performance has been reliant on research-intensive industries. Its dense population and focus on innovation positions Israel well to drive a significant amount of growth for pharmaceutical and medical-device manufacturers.  

The infrastructure of Israel’s healthcare system has come under scrutiny in recent years as the Israeli government continues to rein in its healthcare expenditures. Even though Israel’s economy has recovered from the global financial crisis of 2008-09 better than most advanced, comparably sized economies, constraints are still being placed on the Ministry of Health’s annual budget. In recent years, the Ministry of Health has developed strong capabilities in the areas of health technology assessment (HTA), new technology prioritization, and quality monitoring for community-based care to focus more on value and minimize inefficient spending. Despite these changes, however, the Israeli pharmaceutical market is still expected to grow.

In 1995, Israel enacted a National Health Insurance Act, granting basic health insurance to all Israeli residents, covering a “Health Basket” that includes both medical services and specific medical products. The treatments and products included on this list are set by the state on an annual basis. Residents must pay a certain percentage of income (approximately 5%) to belong to one of the four non-government providers called “sick funds” (“kupat cholim”); in certain cases they are required to make a co-payment for treatment.

While strained political relationships and terrorism remain real threats to Israel’s economy, including its healthcare market, the Israeli health system continues to provide a high standard of care to the population as a whole.  According to global data compiled by Bloomberg, Israel ranked fourth in healthcare efficiency (1). This ranking is particularly impressive considering the relatively moderate level of resources allocated to healthcare. Even though Israel, which joined the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in 2010, has seen accelerated health spending since 2009, national expenditures on health remain lower than for other OECD member nations.  Health spending accounted for 7.7% of gross domestic product (GDP) in Israel in 2011, below the average of 9.3% in OECD countries (2).  

See on www.pharmexec.com

December 23, 2013

Le Serious Game au service de la santé | Ochelys

La Serious Game Expo ouvrait ses portes mercredi 20 novembre à Lyon pour présenter les derniers « jeu sérieux » du moment. Une occasion pour nous de rencontrer les créateurs et d’échanger sur l’apport de ces technologies pour les joueurs, et pour la santé. Qu’est-ce que le Serious Game peut apporter à la santé ? Peut-on allier jeu vidéo et soins ?

L’ENJEU COMPLEXE DES SERIOUS GAME

Toute la difficulté d’un Serious Game est de maintenir l’équilibre entre l’objectif pédagogique du jeu et son aspect ludique, l’idéal étant d’apprendre ou de s’entraîner, en s’amusant. Si le sérieux l’emporte sur le ludique, le jeu devient vite ennuyeux et rébarbatif. Au contraire, si le ludique l’emporte sur le sérieux, alors on perd de vue l’objectif pédagogique qui constitue le Serious Game. Un subtil dosage difficile à réaliser, comme nous avons pu le constater lors de la présentation de certains jeux, où le sérieux prenait trop fortement le pas sur le jeu.

Ce n’était toutefois pas le cas au stand NaturalPad qui présentait leur Serious Game santé Hammer and Planks.

See on www.ochelys.com

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