Archive for ‘Information Technology’

January 6, 2014

Big Data : opportunité lucrative pour les startups | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

3,6 milliards de dollars pour l’année 2013 seule. C’est le montant des investissements enregistrés dans les startups du Big Data cette année. Si le chiffre est pour le moins conséquent, il faut, pour en observer la réelle étendue, le mettre en relation avec le volume des investissement précédents. Ce sont ainsi entre 2008 et 2012 un peu moins de 5 milliards de dollars qui ont été investis. Il apparaît ainsi qu’entre crainte de bulle fiscale et contexte économique inespéré, le Big Data offre des opportunités extrêmement intéressantes pour les jeunes entrepreneurs. C’est du moins ce qui semble se dégager à la lecture de l’infographie publiée par Big Data Startup mettant en lumière les structures de financement et d’investissement des grandes startups de 2013.

Un investissement important et disséminé

Ces 3,6 milliards de dollars ne se sont cependant pas concentrés uniquement sur quelques grandes startups mais semblent bien avoir été répartis de manière relativement égale entre les startups. Ainsi, en moyenne, les levées de fonds de startups du Big Data enregistrées en 2013 s’élevaient à près de 210 millions de dollars. La startup ayant ainsi reçu les investissements les plus importants,Palantir, société qui offre des solutions analytiques au Big Data, a atteint 556 millions de dollars. Toutefois, MongoDB, la seconde startup du classement n’a enregistré “que” 231 millions de dollars. Ce dynamisme des startups du Big Data se retrouve dans les différents processus d’acquisitions et de fusions observés entre les différents acteurs. Il s’agit ainsi non seulement d’opérations effectuées entre startups et ce sur une base relativement fréquente, mais l’on observe surtout de très nombreux rachats de startups par de grandes sociétés. On peut ainsi noter le rachat record deClimate Corporation par Monsanto en octobre, Atlas par Facebook en mars ou de Locationary parApple en juillet.

See on www.atelier.net

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Advertisements
Tags:
January 3, 2014

Big Data “should enable ‘precision’ medical treatment” | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation


Interview with Jean-Pierre Thierry, member of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) oversight committee, on the occasion of a presentation on the ‘World Healt IT 2014’ event, which is due to take place in Nice next April.There’s a lot of talk nowadays about Big Data in health. So where in fact are we on this?

When you look at the ICT sector, you can’t help but notice a style of communication which favours ‘buzz’ or even ‘hype’. What we need to do is identify what’s really happening behind catch-all terms such as ‘Big Data’. Under this term there are two different approaches emerging. Firstly there’s data mining for analysis purposes and secondly there’s Big Data with great emphasis on the ‘Big’, which is very relevant to the health sector today. The volume of medical data which makes up a person’s traditional medical file has vastly increased, especially now that it includes medical imaging. And now that gene studies are starting to become widespread, they are also going to generate considerable volumes of data. Moreover, we’ll have to keep the raw data over a long period so that we can re-examine the databases in the light of advances in medical research.

How are advances in genomics now impacting medical treatment?

As regards the healthcare sector, there’s one thing that needs to be clearly understood: it’s not simply that genomics is going to generate huge volumes of data, we basically need to be able to analyse it, and in particular to look for correlations between certain mutations or between the presence of genes and certain illnesses, cancers being a prime example. This new approach should translate into a truly new approach to performing diagnostics. Whereas generally we used to make an analysis per organ, we’ll now be able to use metabolic pathway analysis, concentrating on the mutations that were present before the illness set in, and on the mutations that we find in the cancerous tumours. We’ll be trying to correlate the presence of these genes with the illness so that we can develop targeted therapies and also provide each individual person with specific prevention advice. What we’re talking about here is technology which could allow us to ‘personalise’ illnesses and patients, or alternatively start out from an average profile and then personalise the approach to treating each individual. This process of ‘individualisation’, which should enable ‘precision’ medical treatment, will mean that we are able to identify ten or twenty different illnesses where before we used to diagnose just one.

See on www.atelier.net

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 26, 2013

Expanding into healthcare big data? Here’s a big data design primer

Aaron Kimball co-founded WibiData in 2010. He has worked with Hadoop since 2007 and is a committer on the Apache Hadoop project.

Software applications have traditionally been perceived as a unit of computation designed and used to solve a problem. Whether an application is a CRM tool that helps manage customer information or a complex supply-chain management system, the problem it solves is often rather specific. Applications are also frequently designed with a relatively static set of input and output interfaces, and communication to and from the application uses specially designed (or chosen) protocols.

Applications are also designed around data. The data that an application uses to solve a problem is stored using a data platform. This underlying data platform has historically been designed to enable optimal data storage and retrieval. Somewhere in the process of storage and retrieval of data, an application applies computation is to produce results in the application.

One unfortunate side effect of this optimized data storage and retrieval design is that it requires data to be structured in a predefined way (both on disk and during information design and retrieval.) In the world of big data, applications must draw on data from rigidly structured elements, such as names, addresses, quantities, and birthdays, as well as to loose and [unstructured data, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unstructured_data] such as images and free-form text.

Defining and building a big data application can be perplexing given the lack of rigidity in the underlying data. This lack of structure makes it more difficult to precisely define what a big data application will do. This applies to communication interfaces, computation on unstructured or semi-structured data and even communication with other applications.

While the traditional application may have solved a specific problem, the big data application doesn’t limit itself to a highly specific or targeted problem. Its objective is to provide a framework to solve many problems. A big data application manages life-cycles of data in a pragmatic and predictable way. Big data applications may include a batch or high-latency component, a low-latency (or real-time component), or even an in-stream component. Big data applications do not replace traditional single-problem applications, but complement them.

See on medcitynews.com

See on Scoop.it – Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 17, 2013

How Electronic Content Management Adds Intelligence to the EHR View

Bridging the information divide: how electronic content management solutions collaborate with EHRs to turn paper files into complete electronic charts.

Managing physical and paper records for the Children’s Hospital of New Orleans, the only full-service hospital exclusively for children in Louisiana, simply became too much of a burden to bear.

With millions of pieces of paper information – from copies of insurance cards, patient intake forms, billing information and other records related to the care of more than 180,000 patients per year — even with its move to an electronic health record, the associated files and paper records simply became too much for the hospital to handle efficiently.

The not-for-profit health system was awash in paper.

For each patient, a paper-based patient file had been kept for each individual who received care, resulting in a huge number of files to manage. A typical file contained copies of patient drivers’ licenses, insurance cards and other personal identifiers. As such, sometimes case files for individual patients grew quite large, especially for those who had frequent visits to the hospital. And, like nearly every other hospital in the U.S., administrators at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans were being forced to keep detailed patient information for individuals who come into the ER once and would never return.

On top of this, record retrieval by staff sometimes spent anywhere between 20 and 30 minutes looking for individual files, and sometimes longer when records department employees were not on hand at certain times, like the night shift.

See on www.hitconsultant.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

December 15, 2013

L’enjeu des données personnelles

Shutterstock Dans le contexte post-affaire Prism, de nombreuses start-up ont compris l’intérêt qu’elles avaient à se positionner sur la…

Dans le contexte post-affaire Prism, de nombreuses start-up ont compris l’intérêt qu’elles avaient à se positionner sur la protection des données personnelles. Les projets se multiplient donc autour de la sécurisation des données des entreprises, mais aussi sur le respect de la vie privée. C’est le cas notamment de SocialSafe, qui tentera de remporter le concours organisé par LeWeb. Cette start-up britannique propose une plate-forme qui centralise toutes les interactions sociales et sauvegarde au même endroit une copie de tout ce que l’on poste sur Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest ou encore LinkedIn. D’autres rivalisent autour d’une solution réellement sécurisée pour les professionnels, comme le Hongrois Tresorit.

See on www.lesechos.fr

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

December 9, 2013

La génération mobile peut dorénavant rester connectée sans effort à échelle mondiale | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

GigSky, une startup californienne propose aux voyageurs une carte SIM universelle qui leur permet de rester connecté de façon simple et pratique lorsqu’ils voyagent à l’étranger.

En raison du coût élevé des communications et de l’accès à internet à l’étranger, les voyageurs sont souvent amenés à éteindre leur téléphone et à se connecter seulement aux accès wifi des hôtels. Ainsi les individus qui tendent à voyager de plus en plus et qui sont habitués à être constamment connectés à internet, se retrouvent pénalisés. Gigsky a souhaité aider cette génération mobile à rester connecté dans le monde entier, en développant un service international de données mobiles haut débit facile à utiliser, rapide et fiable. Ce service bénéficie notamment aux personnes qui sont le plus souvent en déplacement, à savoir les employés sollicitées à voyager régulièrement dans le cadre de leur travail. Ce service leur permet de ne plus avoir à s’encombrer pour trouver un nouvel opérateur et une nouvelle carte SIM dans chaque pays où ils se rendent pour affaires.

Une carte SIM universelle

La startup offre aux voyageurs une carte SIM universelle qui leur permet de rester connectés au réseau 3G/4G sans effort lorsqu’ils voyagent à l’étranger, sans encourir de frais d’itinérance exorbitants et sans avoir à gérer plusieurs cartes SIM et fournisseurs de services mobiles. Avant de se rendre à l’étranger, l’utilisateur insère la carte SIM de données universelle GigSky dans n’importe quel Smartphone déverrouillé, tablette, ordinateur portable ou un routeur mobile, et télécharge l’application GigSky. À l’arrivée, le voyageur peut ouvrir l’application pour sélectionner le réseau internet qu’il souhaite utiliser. L’application permet ensuite à l’utilisateur de gérer les frais engagés pour l’accès au réseau et l’utilisation dans chaque pays. Avec un coût d’achat de la carte SIM inférieur à 20$ et un taux de 0.10$/MB, l’offre de GigSky visent à proposer aux touristes et voyageurs d’affaires, un service de données haut débit mobile abordable dans plus de 70 pays. GigSky offre aussi 10MB de connexion mobile à chaque fois que le voyageur arrive dans un nouveau pays.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags:
December 9, 2013

A chaque écosystème d’objets connectés, son interface unique et dédiée | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Les chercheurs du VTT finlandais ont développé un système permettant de connecter objets connectés ensemble afin de mieux répondre aux évolutions de l’utilisateur.

Si les smartphones ont produit en moins de 10 ans un changement drastique dans la façon dont nous appréhendons notre quotidien, au grand dam des attentes de nombreux utilisateurs, la connectivité entre les objets connectés restent un inconvénient majeur. Que l’on soit ou non adepte d’une marque particulière, connecter smartphone, tablette, télévision et ordinateurs peut sembler aisé mais l’est rarement et peut même pousser à une certaine aversion envers les appareils possédés. Le Centre de Recherche Technique de Finlande, coordinateur de l’initiative européenneSMARCOS, a cherché non seulement à connecter plus aisément les appareils entre eux, mais bien à remettre l’utilisateur au centre de leur utilisation. Pour cela, ils ont associé des interfaces pouvant intégrer différents appareils connectés entre eux à une technologie permettant une analyse comportementale de l’utilisateur en temps réel. Le but : que les différents objets connectés interagissent entre eux et soient à même de suivre et d’adapter leur utilisation aux habitudes de l’utilisateur.

SMARCOS

Plus précisément, l’initiative, dénommée SMARCOS, pour Smart Composite Human-Computer Interfaces, consiste à utiliser les appareils eux-mêmes comme interfaces pour permettre de les connecter à des services cloud. Ce n’est ainsi pas l’interface physique des appareils qui change mais l’interface utilisateur qui devient plus intelligente. Parmi les exemples d’interfaces créées, on retrouve notamment un service encourageant la bonne hygiène de vie de l’utilisateur. Selon les données récupérées, que ce soient à partir de l’accéléromètre intégré au sein du smartphone, la durée d’utilisation de la tablette ou même le temps durant lequel la télévision a pu être allumée, celle-ci était à même d’analyser les données et d’offrir un retour à l’utilisateur. Il était ainsi possible pour l’utilisateur de recevoir non plus seulement des informations centralisées sur ses habitudes de vie et de consommation de produits connectés, mais aussi des conseils, que ce soit de faire plus d’exercice, de ne pas oublier de prendre ses médicaments ou même de proposer des sites et activités culturelles à l’internaute.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

December 5, 2013

Projets des systèmes d’information – CIO-Online – actualités

Comment gérer les projets des systèmes d’information: conseils, actualités, infos, management, analyses et avis d’expert.

Le centre hospitalier de Villefranche-sur-Saône appartient au groupement hospitalier de la banlieue nord-ouest de Lyon. Il rencontrait des problèmes de respect des rendez-vous par des consultants externes pour des examens mobilisant des plateaux techniques coûteux. Or un rendez-vous raté entraîne une mobilisation inutile d’un plateau technique suivie d’une nouvelle mobilisation pour réaliser pour de bon l’examen. Or seule la deuxième mobilisation pouvait être facturée.

Par exemple, le plateau IRM souffrait d’un manque à gagner d’un peu moins de 12 000 euros par mois lié à une cinquantaine de rendez-vous manqués.

Par ailleurs, il fallait prévenir les patients en admission d’une série d’informations comme le code d’accès au parking.

Depuis 2004, le centre hospitalier a organisé son système d’information autour du bus applicatif Antares de Enovacom. Celui-ci permettait d’interfacer des dizaines d’applications. La DSI du centre hospitalier a décidé en 2011 d’utiliser cet outil pour tester l’extraction de données des différents applicatifs pour les traiter dans Push de High Connexion afin d’envoyer des SMS aux patients. L’envoi de SMS a en effet été reconnu comme le moyen le plus universel de communication puisque n’importe lequel des 60 millions de téléphones portables français peut en recevoir. L’ARCEP a ainsi estimé à 180 milliards le nombre de SMS envoyé par an.

Après une phase test en 2011, l’outil a été effectivement déployé en 2012 d’une part pour les rappels de rendez-vous d’autre part pour des communications pratiques comme le code d’entrée du parking à partir d’extractions du dossier patient informatisé sous Cristal-Net.

Le coût moyen de l’envoi de SMS est estimé à moins de 400 euros mais le nombre de rendez-vous non-honorés a chûté de 93% entraînant un gain de près de 11 000 euros.

Le coût du projet lui-même n’a pas été communiqué.

See on www.cio-online.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

November 21, 2013

GE et Quirky veulent standardiser l’Internet des Objets | L’Atelier: Disruptive innovation

Avec un nouveau partenariat, GE appuie la croissance de l’Internet des Objets sur la standardisation et le développement crowdsourcing.

Après avoir défini son paradigme d’Internet Industriel il y a quelques mois, GE étend son incursion dans l’Internet Industriel avec un partenariat stratégique. Après plusieurs produits développés conjointement, GE a signé un partenariat avec Quirky, plateforme de développements d’accessoires connectés domestiques. Outre cet investissement de près de 30 millions de dollars, GE partage ses brevets spécialisés pour encourager le développement de nouveaux produits. Cette startup fonctionnant à la manière d’un accélérateur accompagnant les entrepreneurs dans la réalisation de leurs projets en lien avec l’Internet des Objets vise à harmoniser ce secteur avec une plateforme unique.

Une interface unique

Dans un secteur encore jeune et où les rapports de force ne sont pas encore entièrement constitués, GE et Quirky proposent une première plateforme unifiant les offres multiples d’accessoires de la maison connectée. Cette standardisation passe notamment par la plateforme WINK disponible sur iOS et Android et permettant de contrôler ces produits connectés. Selon Ben Kaufman, CEO et fondateur de Quirky « Notre vision est de faire de WINK le standard adopté par les développeurs des produits de maison connectée. » Plusieurs chaînes de magasins spécialisés américains comme Home Depot ou Best Buy proposent déjà plusieurs produits GE-Quirky compatibles avec la plateforme WINK, notamment Egg Minder un plateau intelligent mesurant la fraicheur des œufs et directement connectés à l’iPhone de l’utilisateur. Autre produit innovant issu de ce partenariat, le Pivot Power Genius se présente sous la forme d’une multiprise pouvant être contrôlée et automatisée à distance.

See on www.atelier.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags: ,
November 21, 2013

Children’s Medical Center Named HIMSS Davies Award Winner

Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy.

The Dallas, Texas-based Children’s Medical Center has been named a 2013 Enterprise HIMSS Davies Award of Excellence winner, the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) announced.

Since 1994, the Nicholas E. Davies Award has recognized excellence in the use of health information technology, specifically the use of the electronic health record (EHR) to successfully improve healthcare delivery processes and patient safety while achieving a demonstrated return on investment.

Winning enterprise organizations include academic medical centers, community hospitals, rural health hospitals and critical-access hospitals.  These organizations must demonstrate the value of the EHR in supporting the delivery of patient care and as well as document improved patient outcomes, identify the challenges faced, and describe the solutions implemented in a manner that can be replicated by other organizations, according to HIMSS officials. Winners of the HIMSS Enterprise Davies Award must have achieved Stage 6 or Stage 7 on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model.

Founded in 1913, the not-for-profit Children’s Medical Center is the fifth-largest pediatric health care provider in the country.  The Medical Center has nearly 700,000 patient admissions and visits annually with 595 licensed beds at its two full-service campuses in Dallas and Plano, multiple specialty clinics and 16 primary care MyChildren’s locations. Children’s was the state’s first pediatric hospital to achieve Level I Trauma status and is the only pediatric teaching facility in North Texas, affiliated with UT Southwestern Medical Center, its officials say.

Children’s Medical Center introduced a concept for pediatric care when the organization embedded clinical pathways into hospital workflows using its EHR. The goal was to decrease variation in care, and improve patient outcomes and the quality of care. The use of pathways for bronchiolitis, asthma and appendicitis (as examples) has reportedly resulted in significantly improved patient outcomes.

“Given how sensitive clinical treatment of children can be because of many factors, e.g., their age, their weight, the use of clinical pathways in pediatric care processes is ‘unchartered waters’ to a certain extent,” Janis Curtis, chair, Davies Enterprise Committee, and business relationship management executive at Duke University Health System, said in a statement.  “What Children’s has done in this regard, and the positive clinical outcomes achieved, is indeed commendable.”

See on www.healthcare-informatics.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

Tags: