Archive for July, 2014

July 25, 2014

What’s Google Doing with Healthcare Blogs?

Has Google got something against smaller blogging sites?

Source: healthworkscollective.com

See on Scoop.itAbout health innovations

July 25, 2014

Can Big Data cure cancer?

A tale of two twenty-something computer whizzes, a mountain of money from Google, and one of the oldest, most vexing problems of all time.

Source: fortune.com

See on Scoop.itAbout health innovations

July 25, 2014

9 Things You’re Doing That Drive Your Doctor Crazy

Type just about any medical symptom you’re experiencing into your browser of choice and you’ll find a wealth of potential causes, cures and complications, ranging from the mundane to the catastrophic.

But calling your doctor because you suspect a …

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

See on Scoop.itAbout health innovations

July 25, 2014

Baseline : Google lance son projet de recherche médicale #hcsmeufr

Google travaille sur un nouveau projet, nommé Baseline : ce dernier a pour objectif de compiler les données médicales issues de milliers d’êtres humains pour déterminer ce qui compose la bonne santé d’un […]

Source: www.clubic.com

See on Scoop.itAbout health innovations

July 22, 2014

Plus d’un tiers des Européens se soignent à l’homéopathie

A l’occasion du 69ème congrés mondial d’homéopathie intitulé « Stratégies thérapeutiques et critères de guérison », qui se déroulait la semaine dernière à Paris, un millier de médecins venus de 48 pays ont démontré la part grandissante de…

Source: www.carevox.fr

July 22, 2014

Could health apps save your life? That depends on the FDA

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates everything from heart monitors to horse vaccines, will soon have its hands full with consumer health apps and devices.

 

The vast majority of the health apps you’ll find in Apple’s or Google’s app stores are harmless, like step counters and heart beat monitors. They’re non-clinical, non-actionable, and informational or motivational in nature.

 

But the next wave of biometric devices and apps might go further, measuring things like real-time blood pressure, blood glucose, and oxygen levels. More clinical apps

The FDA is charged with keeping watch on the safety and efficacy of consumer health products. Lately, that includes more clinical apps as well as devices you might buy at the drugstore, like a home glucose testing kit.

 

“It’s these apps that the FDA says it will regulate,” David Bates of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Physicians Organization told VentureBeat in June. These apps will have to go through the full 510(k) process,” he said.

 

Dr. Bates chaired a group to advise the FDA on how to review health apps for approval, and on how the FDA should advise developers.

“It was intended to help them think through the risk factors involved with these products and then give guidance on how to stay within the guidelines,” he said.

 

“The device makers were asking from some guidance from The FDA on what types of things would be accepted and what wouldn’t,” Bates said.

Bates believes the FDA wants to use a light regulatory touch when looking at new medical devices. “The FDA definitely wants innovation to continue in clinical devices,” he said. “In general the FDA knows that the vast majority of apps are just informational.”

 

The FDA’s final guidance focuses on a small subset of mobile apps that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended.

 

Health apps go mainstream

The big software companies (Apple, Google, and Samsung) have brought attention to, and lent credibility to, apps and devices that do more than count steps. These companies are building large cloud platforms designed to collect health data from all sorts of health apps and devices.

 

more at http://venturebeat.com/2014/07/21/health-apps-are-changing-so-must-the-fda/

 

Source: venturebeat.com

July 22, 2014

Can Mobile Technologies and Big Data Improve Health?

After decades as a technological laggard, medicine has entered its data age. Mobile technologies, sensors, genome sequencing, and advances in analytic software now make it possible to capture vast amounts of information about our individual makeup and the environment around us. The sum of this information could transform medicine, turning a field aimed at treating the average patient into one that’s customized to each person while shifting more control and responsibility from doctors to patients.

 

The question is: can big data make health care better?

 

“There is a lot of data being gathered. That’s not enough,” says Ed Martin, interim director of the Information Services Unit at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine. “It’s really about coming up with applications that make data actionable.”

 

The business opportunity in making sense of that data—potentially $300 billion to $450 billion a year, according to consultants McKinsey & Company—is driving well-established companies like Apple, Qualcomm, and IBM to invest in technologies from data-capturing smartphone apps to billion-dollar analytical systems. It’s feeding the rising enthusiasm for startups as well.

 

Venture capital firms like Greylock Partners and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, as well as the corporate venture funds of Google, Samsung, Merck, and others, have invested more than $3 billion in health-care information technology since the beginning of 2013—a rapid acceleration from previous years, according to data from Mercom Capital Group.   more at http://www.technologyreview.com/news/529011/can-technology-fix-medicine/ ;

Source: www.technologyreview.com

July 22, 2014

Survey: 75 percent of patients want digital health services | mobihealthnews

According to a survey of thousands of patients in Germany, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, the adoption of digital healthcare services remains low because existing services are either low quality or not meeting patients’ needs. The survey, conducted by consulting firm McKinsey, included responses from at least 1,000 patients in the three countries.

“Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations; decision makers often cite data that point to relatively low usage of digital healthcare services,” McKinsey analysts Stefan Biesdorf and Florian Niedermann wrote in a recent blog post. “In fact, the results of our survey reveal something quite different. The reason patients are slow to adopt digital healthcare is primarily because existing services don’t meet their needs or because they are of poor quality.” 

McKinsey found that more than 75 percent of respondents would like to use some kind of digital health service. Many are interested in “mundane” offerings, the firm wrote.

 

 

Source: mobihealthnews.com

July 22, 2014

Four Ways to Help Patients Find Reliable Online Health Information

 

Most physicians agree that we have an ethical obligation to help educate our patients about what’s going on with their health, but what does that look like in a world overwhelmed with digital health information? And how do we budget appropriate time when we’re already struggling to balance shorter appointment times, more documentation requirements, and busier clinic schedules?

It’s estimated that 72 percent of patients get a majority of their health information online. With an abundance of biased and incorrect information on the Internet, our responsibility as physicians has evolved from simply teaching patients about their health conditions to now include educatingpatients on where and how to find and identify reliable health information.

This premise goes back to why I use social media. We have a responsibility to share, or at the very least be cognizant of, reliable health information in the realm where our patients seek it. In the old days that looked like an exam room; today it looks like a Google search.

Here are four ways to efficiently help ensure patients have the resources they need to find reliable health information, despite cramped clinic visits and time constraints.

Ask: How can you possibly know where patients find their information if you don’t ask? I have patients come in with birth plans all the time and quite frequently they’ve printed them out from a website with little-to-no additional research into the (often very specific) things they’ve requested. You can’t possibly know or understand their views unless you ask.

Take Two: I understand how limited our time is – I’m a resident with a busy clinic and short, often over-booked appointment slots. But taking two minutes to discuss reliable health information with your patients has great potential for improving patient care and decreasing un-needed visits and calls.

Prep: Have pre-written, condition-specific information for your patients and include curated links to additional reliable information for those who may want it. It’s as simple as a “dot-phrase” on most major EMR systems or a copy/paste file you can quickly email or print.

Encourage: Encourage your patients to take control of their health by being informed.Encourage them to ask questions and explain things back to you, so you’re certain they have a grasp on it. Encourage them to share what they’ve learned in their searches.

Source: www.thedoctorblog.com

July 20, 2014

Healthcare Social Media

Healthcare Social Media by Kelly Mellott and Stacey Simon March 29, 2014

Source: www.slideshare.net