Archive for June, 2014

June 30, 2014

Philips-Salesforce connect health apps to doctors | Integrated Care Today

Salesforce and Philips are wading into the healthcare technology race with a cloud-based platform designed to help doctors track data from a multitude of devices.

Source: www.integratedcaretoday.com

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June 30, 2014

Google, Apple, Samsung: the big three data hubs and digital health’s next phase

Tech writers are on the hunt to find out which spaces in the digital health arena are most likely to be seriously impacted by (the article uses provocative language like ‘steamroll[ered]’ and ‘crushed’ by Apple, Google and Samsung’s entry into the digital health space. 

Source: insights.wired.com

June 30, 2014

Santé : quand le numérique répond aux nouveaux enjeux de la prévention

E-santé, télédiagnostics… le numérique nous fait basculer dans une logique de prévention renforcée. De quoi alléger les coûts pour la sécurité sociale ? Trois experts du secteur en débattent et présentent les initiatives de santé connectée de leurs organismes respectifs.

Source: www.rslnmag.fr

June 30, 2014

5 Reasons Why Healthcare Data Is Difficult to Measure – HITECH Answers

Healthcare data is both diverse and complex making linear analysis useless. There are several characteristics of healthcare data that make it unique.

Source: www.hitechanswers.net

June 30, 2014

Les associations de patients financées par les labos : quels risques ? : Allodocteurs.fr

Toutes les maladies ou presque ont leur association de patients. En France, il en existe environ 14.000. Certaines d’entre elles entretiennent des relations embarrassantes avec les firmes pharmaceutiques.

Source: www.allodocteurs.fr

June 29, 2014

Corruption: medicine’s dirty open secret | BMJ

Healthcare is a high risk sector for corruption. Best estimates are that between 10% and 25% of global spend on public procurement of health is lost through corruption.1 This is big bucks. Total global spend on healthcare is more than $7 trillion each year. Corruption takes many forms, depending on the country’s level of development and health financing system.2 The United States, for example, lost between $82bn and $272bn in 2011 to medical embezzlement, mostly related to its health insurance system.3 No country is exempt from corruption. Patients everywhere are harmed when money is diverted to doctors’ pockets and away from priority services. 

Source: www.bmj.com

June 29, 2014

Can ROI be Measured for Social Media?

In part two of our social media myths series, we revealed several ways social media posts can help generate business for your medical or dental practice. For our third and final installment of the series, we’re going to debunk a common misconception about tracking the performance of your social media marketing campaign.

Myth #3: ROI cannot be measured for social media marketing.

As with any aspect of a business, justifying the investment you put into social media marketing based on the return it yields for your practice is essential to ensuring its worth. One thing to understand is that social media is not a tool for direct sales, therefore, we cannot use traditional return on investment (ROI) metrics. While the textbook definition of ROI – exact dollar profit for dollars spent – may be a little harder to pinpoint, measuring the value of your investment for social media is not impossible. In fact, doing so can be relatively easy. Here are three ways to measure social media ROI in order to track the efficacy of your practice’s social media marketing efforts:

  1. Create specific goals.

You must understand the purpose of your social media campaign in order to measure success. Create specific, measurable goals, such as: lead generation, increasing traffic to your practice website, and facilitating customer service. When people call or email your practice, you can ask how they heard about your practice and track the number of times social media is cited. HootSuite, Twitter Analytics, and Facebook Insights can track engagement with your followers, and engagement is a way for you to provide online customer service, thus reducing the time and money spent for overall customer service. Tools like Google Analytics track the amount of web traffic generated from social media, as well as which specific social media sites have the highest referral rates to your website.

  1. Track campaigns.

Track the number of social media followers, comments, likes, retweets, etc., on a monthly basis to determine if your social strategy is actually increasing the amount of engagement with your practice. In addition to social media engagement, you can track other things like web traffic and conversions to quantitatively analyze if your social media efforts are increasing the number of viewers to your website, as well as the number of people who contact you through an email contact form on your website.

  1. Establish a baseline.

One thing you may want to know is if your social media efforts are directly impacting the number of new patients or overall number of procedures performed. You can establish a baseline figure prior to the start of your social media campaign by tracking the number of overall patients and the number of procedures performed monthly. As your social media activity increases, you can see if the number of new patients and procedures performed increases as well.

 

Source: www.rosemontmedia.com

June 29, 2014

Etude My Santé Mobile : l’usage d’un coach électronique a un impact sur la santé — Silver Economie

Les résultats de l’étude My santé Mobile ont été révélés ce matin : l’usage d’un capteur d’activité permet de modifier les comportements en santé.

Source: www.silvereco.fr

June 29, 2014

2019: Wearable sensing devices to be a $47.4B market | mobihealthnews

According to a recent report from ON World, in the next fives years an estimated 700 million wearable technology devices will ship worldwide, which will make for a $47.4 billion market. The research firm predicts that hardware sales will continue to dominate revenues for the next five years but monitoring services, apps, and subscriptions will have faster growth rates.

Source: mobihealthnews.com

June 29, 2014

Quantified Self: How Self-tracking Technology Can Improve Your Life

By utilizing wearable self-trackers like the Nike Fuel, the Jawbone Up or the Fitbit products, we can track some of our personal activities and acquire vast amount of data on ourselves. But can these tech wonders really enhance our lives and make us happier? Will they really give us answers or will they only lead to more questions and confusion?

Source: blog.goalmap.com