Archive for August, 2013

August 25, 2013

Doctor completes liver surgery with aid of iPad augmented reality app

A German doctor surgeon has leveraged the power of Apple’s iPad and an accompanying augmented reality app to assist him in the completion of a surgery, marking one of the first times a procedure has been performed in such a manner.

Using an iPad, surgeons in Bremen, Germany, were able to create a virtual 3D pre-op plan for one patient’s procedure, reports Reuters. [Warning: Some graphic images.] The surgeons took a picture of the patient’s liver with the iPad’s camera. The app then constructs an augmented reality overlay of the liver, showing the physicians where essential structures such as tumors and blood vessels lie.

The augmented reality overlay is built off of scans of the organ that were performed prior to the surgery. Having the actual layout of the organ visible before beginning allows surgeons to avoid potential complications and could result in more efficient operations.

The team behind the app sees it potentially having further applications beyond just the liver. It could also be used to help in excising tumors from the pancreas and other organs.

While this is one of the first times an iPad has played such a role in the actual process of a surgery, Apple’s popular tablets and smartphones have become quite popular among doctors. Apple devices arethe top choice among physicians, and those doctors are continually finding ways to integrate them into their daily practices.

See on appleinsider.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 25, 2013

Why mHealth is not a fad but is here to stay (infographic) | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

There are still some doubters who are skeptical of new shifts in healthcare such as the quantified self movement and mhealth. This infographic from CDW Healthcare using data from multiple sources should help to silence them.

There are still some doubters who are skeptical of new shifts in healthcare such as the quantified self movement and mhealth. This infographic from CDW Healthcare using data from multiple sources should help to silence them.

One of the biggest drivers of mhealth are doctors themselves. Even app usage is growing among clinicians with 34% using apps to monitor data from medical devices now, compared with 27% who reported doing so in 2012.

See on www.mddionline.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

 

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August 25, 2013

Interest in medical uses for Android platform surpasses iPhone

Searches for android medical recently surpassed searches for iPhone medical according to Google Trends analysis.

The screen shot for the first comparison is shown below with iPhone medical plotted in blue and Android medical plotted in red. Several noteworthy findings can be seen in this comparison. First, iPhone medical clearly emerges as the earliest device with a nearly two year period before Android medical. Second, the iPhone medical keyword search peaked in early 2012. It is trending downward since that time. Third, Google Trends shows Android medical search terms recently equaling and then surpassing iPhone medical searches.

In the second screen shot, the Google Trends forecast function shows expected trends in searches for the next few months. The forecast lines for the next six months show a trend for increasing Android medical searches with a stagnant trend for iPhone medical searches.

See on www.imedicalapps.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

August 25, 2013

Mobile Technology Could Put Health In Hands of Patients

The health care gold rush is on as companies chase smarter home monitoring device technologies.

If health care is the new gold rush, then it’s no surprise Silicon Valley’s high-tech companies, entrepreneurs and recent MBAs hope to strike it rich on the heels of U.S. health care reform.

A growing number of today’s technological gold-seekers want to help patients manage chronic disease. Specifically, they are interested in home monitoring devices – wireless trackers that can send thousands of electrocardiogram (EKG) tracings, blood sugar levels or other bodily statistics directly to health care professionals.

While home monitoring devices may have a glittering future, some of today’s tech companies are chasing fool’s gold.

That’s because some promoters of home monitoring technology believe doctors will carefully scrutinize each EKG or blood sugar reading and use the information to tailor perfect regimens for their patients. This is nothow medicine works.

See on www.forbes.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

August 25, 2013

L’iPad comme outil pour une opération du foie, grâce à la réalité augmentée

Reuters a révélé l’incroyable opération sur un patient atteint d’un cancer du…

L’iPad comme outil pour une opération du foie, grâce à la réalité augmentée

Reuters a révélé l’incroyable opération sur un patient atteint d’un cancer du foie dans un hôpital de Hambourg, et assitée avec un iPad !

La tablette stérilisée et placée dans un emballage fut utilisée afin de projeter un modèle en 3D de l’organe malade, ce qui a permis de mettre en évidence les parties à ôter, de celles à préserver, ainsi que de présenter clairement le réseau veineux du foie.

L’opération a été une véritable réussite, l’iPad associé à la technologie de réalité augmentée risque d’être dans un avenir proche des outils médicaux rapidement reconnu.

See on www.ipad-journal.fr

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

August 25, 2013

10 Notable medical apps released this past week

A list of the key medical apps released this past week

The following are 10 notable medical apps that were released this past week.

1. PocketSim

Quick Points:
– A free ECG learning application that helps you identify arrhythmias
– It’s free right now, so definitely worth a download

Cost: Free

Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pocketsim/id688419223?mt=8

2. Stroke: Patient

Quick Points:
– App claims to be created by a team of stroke specialists.
– Could potentially be useful for patients who suffered stroke or are at higher risk, and their families.

Cost: Free

…..

See on www.imedicalapps.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 25, 2013

5 Opportunities for Action to Accelerate Digital Health in Canada

Strategic plan identifies 5 opportunities for action to accelerate digital health in Canada over the next several years to improve the patient experience.

Strategic plan identifies 5 opportunities for action to accelerate digital health in Canada over the next several years to improve the patient experience.

Canada has been on its digital health journey for 10 years with an estimated $7.7 billion in benefits accrued to Canadians and care system as a result of investments in telehealth, drug information systems and diagnostic imaging solutions, according to Canada Health Infoway. Despite the progress made, many still feel innovation in healthcare is falling short in Canada.

“Healthcare in Canada is in dire need of change,” said, Joe Natale, TELUS’ Chief Commercial Officer at the recent Canadian Telecom Summit. Natale also criticized the government for slow progress and lack of healthcare innovation suggesting that there should be a private element to wireless medicine, mobile health and health IT services to improve healthcare. (Mobile Syrup,06/04)

Recognizing how digital health is evolving with the health care system to meet the needs of Canadians, Infoway, an independent, not-for-profit organization funded by the federal government released Opportunities for Action: A Pan-Canadian Digital Health Strategic Plan. The refreshed plan outlines health care priorities that digital health solutions can improve the patient experience over the coming years and identifies key opportunities for action.

See on www.hitconsultant.net

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 25, 2013

GSK’s Crohn’s disease treatment fails in Phase III trial

LONDON (Reuters) – British pharmaceutical group GlaxoSmithKline Plc said vercirnon, a drug it was developing to treat Crohn’s disease and licensed from ChemoCentryx, had failed in a late-stage clinical trial.

The medicine, which GSK licensed from the California-based company in 2010, did not improve the incidence of adverse events in patients when measured against a placebo, GSK said on Friday, and there was a trend for overall adverse events to increase as dosage levels increased.

The trial failure wiped as much as $242 million, or nearly half, from ChemoCentryx’s value. Its shares were trading down 36 percent at $7.47 at 1438 GMT. GSK’s shares were up 0.3 percent at 1,672 pence, underperforming a 0.7 percent stronger FTSE 100 index.

See on news.yahoo.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 25, 2013

Medical devices that become obsolete against a smartphone

We have already looked at how a mobile phone can be used as a tool for helping and monitoring people with certain medical conditions (like for example diabetes patients or people with reduced eyesight), but more and more apps and accessories are appearing…

We have already looked at how a mobile phone can be used as a tool for helping and monitoring people with certain medical conditions (like for example diabetes patients or people with reduced eyesight), but more and more apps and accessories are appearing in the mHealth field, which make use of the features of smartphones in order to replace other traditional medical devices.

The advantage of this type of services and tools is obvious: a considerable cost reduction for medical devices, which not only allows anybody to obtain such devices to monitor a patient at home, but it also makes it less difficult to provide them in developing countries, regions in crisis or areas, where the closest hospital may be hundreds of kilometers away.

SpiroSmart, your Phone turned into a Spirometer

A spirometry may be one of the tests most frequently done on asthma patients and others suffering from breathing problems, fundamentally measuring lung capacity and volume. Although portable spirometers do exist, wouldn’t it be great to be able to take these measures wherever you are with your mobile phone?

This is exactly what a group of researchers from Washington University enables you to do with SpiroSmart, an application which – without any additional accessories – allows you to use your smartphone in place of a spirometer. It works in a very simple way: All you need to do, is blow towards the telephone allowing it to analyze the sound frequency. The application uses the user’s windpipe and voice chords to replace the tubes in traditional spirometers.

See on mobileworldcapital.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision

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August 25, 2013

BMI isn’t an accurate measure of your health, experts say

As waistlines around the globe continue expanding, some scientists say that it’s time to do away with a common way to measure weight: body mass index (BMI).

BMI, which is based on weight and height, is not an accurate measure of body fat content and does not account for critical factors that contribute to health, such where you carry your fat, proportion of muscle to fat, and sex and racial differences in body composition, the researchers said in an editorial published Friday in the journal Science.

“Most studies depend on BMI, and we know it’s not a very accurate measure,” coauthor of the Dr. Rexford Ahima, a medical professor at the University of Pennsylvania, told LiveScience.

For one, BMI doesn’t take into account how much belly fat a person may carry. Abdominal fat increases the risks of a host of illnesses, whereas peripheral fat, or fat beneath the skin, is considered less risky.

See on news.yahoo.com

From Pharmaceutical Industry digital vision